The 2021 NFL Draft is quickly approaching, so that means it’s time for everyone’s daily off-season activity mock draft season.
So, just like general manager and team scouts, a few members here on the Eagles Nation section of PHLSportsNation have begun putting together our draft board in efforts to make the first edition of our Philadelphia Eagles 7-round mock draft.

Using the Mock Draft Machine, produced by our friends over at The Draft Network, let’s see how we can improve the Eagles roster heading into the off-season.


Round 1, Pick 6 // Kyle Pitts, TE (Florida)

Photo: John Raoux/Associated Press

Info

  • Height: 6’6
  • Weight: 246 lbs
  • Classification: Junior
  • Arms: ???
  • Hands: ???

Scouting Report

The 6’6/240 pound pass catcher out of Florida is a defense’s nightmare and a quarterback’s dream. While many will identify him by his position title, it doesn’t take long into some Pitts tape to see why he seems to be one of the most sort after prospects in the entire class.

This isn’t your traditional tight end; Pitts’ skillset gives you the ability to uses him across any formation. In fact, his final season in Gainesville saw 36% of Pitts snaps come from outside an inline formation, per Pro Football Focus.

With his ceiling, versatility, and collegiate production, Pitts has the capabilities to be the best pass-catching prospect in the entire draft. He thrives in 3×1 sets as the X receiver; he’s a handful for any linebacker or safety to match up with when in the slot. Teams even tried putting their top cornerback option on him, which resulted in matchups against the likes of Patrick Surtain, Jaycee Horn, and Tyson Campbell, to no avail.


Pitts’ performance against some of the SECs best even opened the eyes of Alabama head coach Nick Saban.


Over time Pitts became the face of a Florida offense that also features first-round wide receiver prospect Kadarius Toney. Pitts, a smooth route runner, has excellent use of his frame and body control which often help him out position defender for the football. Shows off a smooth release, especially on slant routes but could use some development when trying to break vertical. His massive catch radius makes him almost impossible to single cover. Actually, his grade of 95 has him tied with Devonta Smith as the only two players in the country with this grade against single coverage.

Pitts does his fair share of work as a blocker as well. While his bread and butter is obviously in the receiving department, his sturdy frame allows him to hold off blockers for just enough time. Placing Pitts in Philadelphia would immediately make him the best pass-catching option on the roster and will open a lot of things up for the newly hired Nick Sirianni.


Round 2, Pick 37 // Trevon Moehrig, S (TCU)

Info

  • Height: 6’2
  • Weight: 202
  • Classification: Junior
  • Arms: ???
  • Hands: ???

Scouting Report

Talk about covering some ground. Trevon Moehrig is without question the best single high safety in the entire class. A classic center fielder on the TCU defense, Moehrig has the ability to make an impact on day one. A smart and instinctive player has a great understanding of what he is asked to do and what the offense would like to do, which allows him to quickly close in on windows that most safeties wouldn’t, let alone at this point in his career. There wasn’t one player in the country that lived around the ball as much as Moehrig did over the past two seasons, leading the nation in PBU in both 2019 and 2020. It’s almost as if you took Justin Reid’s frame and Quandre Diggs’ skill set and came out with Moehrig.

With Rodney McLeod coming off a second ACL tear in three seasons, the Eagles will have to address the position sooner or later. If the new coaching staff is interest in McLeod or acquiring a player with similar traits, then the 2020 Thorpe Award winner. Moehrig has shown an ability to play in both single high and two-deep zones, as well as man-to-man coverage. As a run defender Moehrig shows promises, but there is certainly room left to grow. Outside of that, there aren’t many holes in Moehrig’s game, and his presence on the Philadelphia defense would fill a much-needed void.


Round 3, Pick 70 // Amon-Ra St. Brown, WR (USC)

Photo: USC Athletics

Info

  • Height: 6’1
  • Weight: 195 lbs
  • Classification: Junior
  • Arm: ???
  • Hands: ???

Scouting Report

Stop me when you’ve heard this story before: USC receiver has a bit of a fan base but is generally underrated through the draft process due to the absurd amount of depth in the class he’s featured in. Goes on to get selected by an offensive in which the game plan has Nick Sirianni’s fingerprints all over it, starts slow but ends up having a spectacular rookie season. You can find this from just one year ago when Michael Pittman Jr was selected by the Indianapolis Colts with the 34th pick in the second round of the NFL draft.

This isn’t to say that history would repeat itself, but if there was a system that would allow Amon-Ra St. Brown to perform to his strengths, it’s what they are trying to build in Philadelphia. The brother of Green Bay Packers wide receiver Equanimeous St. Brown and son of a bodybuilding legend John Brown.

While St. Brown isn’t spectacular at any one thing, he does just about everything particularly well. Is more quick than fast, not the greatest deep speed but usually accelerates enough at the beginning of the route to create a fair amount of space; it remains to be seen if that will work against NFL-level talent. At the same time, St. Brown had a pretty good 2020 season filling the void Pittman’s departure left as the primary target on the Trojans offense, including a lot of snaps from the outside. His best production came in 2019 when he was primarily used from the slot in the year Pittman was mostly the X receiver. St. Brown comes from a similar mold of the Deebo Samuel and A.J. Brown of recent years can impact a game at all three levels, though he makes his money on the deep post. Has the occasional drop but looks to be a product of looking to run before he has the ball instead of any hands issues. Has shown the ability to make an impact on the ground game, more-so in 2019 than 2020.

St. Brown is best with the ball in his hands looking to operate in space, running back-esque frame makes him a handful to tackle in open space. Nice at the catch point and high pointing the football.


Round 3, Pick 84 // Chazz Surratt, LB (North Carolina)

Info

  • Height: 6’1
  • Weight: 227 lbs
  • Classification: Senior (RS)
  • Arms: ???
  • Hands: ???

Scouting Report

A former quarterback and one of the most cerebral players in the country. The position switch allowed Surratt the opportunity to become the quarterback of the Tar Heel defense, often playing with an elite sense of urgency and is relentless when in pursuit of the football. Surratt is a surreal athlete for someone who has played quarterback and linebacker, flips his hips fluidly, has really good range, and in 2020 improved tremendously in one of the few areas that we had questions surrounding. Pass coverage was once considered a weakness for Surratt, but in 2020 he took the necessary steps in the development to help erase some of that doubt. While there are some matchups Surratt would like to avoid, he has shown an ability to be serviceable in man coverage, in particular over tight ends.

Surratt is still very much a work in progress, with him still being fairly new to the position and defense as a whole. He has had a problem with some missed tackles over the last few seasons but seemed to improve towards the end of 2020, with only one missed tackle through his final five games. Still, with his current skill set, Surratt projects to be the prototypical linebacker in the modern NFL.


Round 5, Pick 150 // Chauncey Golston, EDGE (Iowa)

Photo: Joseph Cress/Iowa City Press-Citizen

Info

  • Height: 6’5
  • Weight: 268 lbs
  • Classification: Senior (RS)
  • Arms: 33.75″
  • Hands: 11″

Scouting Report

High motor guy doesn’t take plays off and plays until he hears a whistle. The things you cant teach. Explosive off the snap, really good use of his hands as seen at the Senior Bowl.


Favorite move is the slap but should consider developing a secondary move.


The versatile player mostly played along the edge at Iowa but can be impactful as the three techs in sub-packages. Not much of a block-shedder; can be bullied by stronger guys and stagnated by more athletic guys.

The odds are if he doesn’t win the snap, he won’t will the rep. Better fit to be a rotational pass rusher at this point in his career could become a key contributor along a defensive line if properly developed.


Round 5, Pick 156 // Chuba Hubbard, RB (Oklahoma State)

Info

  • Height: 6’0
  • Weight: 208 lbs
  • Classification: Junior (RS)
  • Arm: ???
  • Hands: ???

Scouting Report

Probably the most difficult player I’ve scoured through the entire draft process. Who exactly is Chuba Hubbard? Is it the 2,000-yard rusher that we saw take the nation by storm in 2019 and head into the 2020 season as a projected Heisman finalist? Or is it the indecisive, inconsistent, and had a massive case of the fumbles. You would have to think that this season was more of an anomaly, and Hubbard is closer to the runner we have seen at the height of his powers to close 2018 and all of 2019. Could the 300+ carry workload played a factor in the regression? What about the fact for the first time since his freshman season, Hubbard split carries with other backs on the roster? Or possibly the fact that no team really expected freshman quarterback Shane Illingworth to beat them, so they purposely stacked the box and made life hard on Hubbard. Surely all of these played a factor, but there is no denying what was shown on film over his first two seasons.

An elusive one cut back that is known for making defenders miss in space (which is what made 2020s tape so strange). He shows a nice burst and can make an impact as a between-the-tackles due to his quality vision. He doesn’t break many tackles and not the greatest pass protector (he tries, but sometimes that’s just not enough gets easily overpowered by stronger defenders).

The Eagles could use just a consistent force as a runner to come in and spell Miles Sanders for some carries throughout games. Hubbard offers the team that ability, though he has nowhere near the same impact as Sanders in the receiving game. Hubbard may not contribute immediately as a lead back, but as part of a committee, he can be viewed as an NFL offensives version of the sixth man.


Round 6, Pick 188 // Jamie Newman, QB (Wake Forest/Georgia)

Photo: Andrew Dye/Winston Salem-Journal

Info

  • Height: 6’3
  • Weight: 235 lbs
  • Classification: Senior (RS)
  • Arms: 30.5″
  • Hands: 10″

Scouting Report

This is exactly the type of selection you’d expect from Howie Roseman; after all, this is the quarterback factory, right? Roseman reportedly received strict orders to build around quarterback Jalen Hurts this off-season from Owner Jeffrey Lurie. However, those orders don’t permit Roseman from taking a quarterback at all at some point down the line. The selection of Jamie Newman allows the Eagles a mulligan of sorts on the Jalen Hurts selection. The idea behind the Hurts selection was to at some point give Philadelphia a valuable option at the backup position while giving the coaching staff an opportunity to develop a prospect with a high ceiling and low floor. The problem was taking that player in the second round, in this case, selecting a prospect like Newman at this point in the draft allows the Philadelphia coaching staff to buy Jalen Hurts the proper time to see if the team should commit to him for the foreseeable future or should the team explore other options, especially given the early uncertainty surrounding the 2022 quarterback class.

Newman finished his career with an 86.5 overall performance grade according to Pro Football Focus, despite the lack of supporting cast during his time at Wake Forest. A terrific athlete Newman was a threat as both a passer and a rusher during his collegiate career. Though all of us can only wonder what the prospects of Newman in Todd Monken’s pro-style system would have looked like should he had decided to play at Georgia last fall, instead were left with questions surrounding his abilities to perform outside of a spread offense. Those questions only arose more following a Senior Bowl performance where Newman only completed 10 passes and was sacked five times; he will need to show he is able to successfully go through progressions on a consistent basis. His mechanics tend to fail him as the pocket collapses, but he has enough arm strength to get the ball to receivers from stressful angles. Despite the questions surrounding Newman and his projected development, you can’t help but get excited when you watch him get in a groove and the impact he can make on a game.

At 6’3/230lb, Newman has the prototypical build of an NFL quarterback. He has shown excellent leadership skills and has shown flashes of NFL playmaking abilities, especially as a sophomore but has a ways to go before he is considered to be prepared for a starting gig. I would have benefited from an extra year of school and could be considered a bit of a project but one with low risk–high reward potential.


Round 6, Pick 223 // D.J. Daniel, CB (Georgia)

Info

  • Height: 6’0
  • Weight: 185 lbs
  • Classification: Senior
  • Arms: 33″
  • Hands: 9.125″

Scouting Report

Now we’re talking business; the Eagles have a need at cornerback of the other side of Darius Slay. Now we’re not saying that. D.J. Daniel will come in day one and contribute immediately as a starter, but this is the type of cornerback that newly hired defensive coordinator Jonathan Gannon seems to favor. Though Daniel probably wouldn’t be considered a ‘tall’ cornerback given his 6’0 frame, his physicality and 33″ arms make him a handful for receivers to deal with. Especially in press coverage, though, I would like to see him begin to trust his technique instead of trying to overpower receivers when in press coverage. Tends to use two hands in press coverage which can lead to him losing balance when the press is properly beaten. Has pretty good feet and athleticism which allows him to stay close to receivers in coverage. Not much of a ‘playmaker,’ doesn’t have any sort of takeaways in two years at Georgia.

Daniel has arguably been Georgia’s most consistent cornerback since his arrival. Shows better technique than his peers in Athens. Daniel should be able to carve out a role on special teams as he continues to develop, but based on his skillset heading into the league, a fit on a zone-heavy defense seems best suited. It is inspiring that he has good film on NFL-level receivers from his time in the SEC, including an impressive tape against possibly the first receiver off the board in this class Ja’Marr Chase.


Round 6, Pick 224 // Tarron Jackson, EDGE (Coastal Carolina)

Photo: Coastal Carolina Athletics

Info

  • Height: 6’2
  • Weight: 260 lbs
  • Classification: Senior (RS)
  • Arms: 33″
  • Hands: 10.125″

Scouting Report


A freak athlete!


Look at the explosion at the snap and the strength to overpower the lineman and transition into a pass-rushing move. Something Tarron Jackson did all week long at the Senior Bowl and all season long against opposing offensive tackles. Producing 58 quarterback pressures, 31 quarterback hits, and eight sacks in 2020. Jackson has a good understanding of hand usage and leverage control which, combined with his size, can create all sorts of problems up front. Jackson has a future in this league either as a rotational pass rusher or even a presence in the run game in just about any spot along with the interior.

For his production over the last two seasons, you can make the argument Jackson is generally underrated in his class, probably due to the lack of competition faced at Coastal Carolina and limited production in games against higher-level competition.


Round 7, Pick 232 // Ambry Thomas, CB (Michigan)

Info

  • Height: 6’0
  • Weight: 189 lbs
  • Classification: Senior
  • Arms: 31.125″
  • Hands: 8.5″

Scouting Report

A unique prospect in his own right, Ambry Thomas was only a one-year starter at Michigan and in that one season performed like a prospect well on his way to becoming a day one or two selection in this year’s draft. Thomas produced three interceptions, three PBUs, and posted a 56.3 passer rating when targeted in 2019; and expressed interest in playing in 2020 but opted out after the B1G conference initially canceled its fall football season. Based on his 2019 tape, you see a player that projects to be a starting cornerback in the league at some point. Would probably be viewed higher if teams had more than just 12 games of tape on him. Still, Thomas is another of those corners defensive coordinator Jonathan Gannon loves to invest in. His physicality at the release is aided by his 31,125″ arms.

Thomas is fluid when flipping hips and maintaining stride without losing much if any acceleration. Good speed and stop and start abilities, has a knack for finding the football to either break up a pass or take the ball away. Thomas even offers potential as a return man which is a role he can be used in early in his career as teams work to catch him back up to speed and continue to polish some of his skills. If a team is willing to be patient, Thomas offers a good return in investment, boasting one of the highest ceilings in the class.


Featured Image: Jon Durr/Getty Images
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